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Introduction

Unit overview, learning objectives and content standards

Lesson 1: Can humans objectively identify evil?

The first lesson begins by problematizing the idea of pure evil. Through a few examples, students are presented with the case that “evil” and “good” are time-bound and culturally specific associations; thus, evil does not always look and feel the same to everyone.

Lesson instructions
1.1 Worksheet: A tale of two travelers
1.2 Worksheet: Breaking news
1.3 Templates
Presentation

Lesson 1: Optional extension

The optional extension builds on lesson one by exploring, as case studies, certain marriage practices that are currently considered unethical but were regularities for much of human history. The detailed activity reinforces for students the notion that humans cannot determine what ‘evil’ is in absolute terms.

Lesson instructions
1.4 Worksheet: A historical exploration of child marriages
Presentation

Lesson 2: God’s perspective on evil is All-Knowing

The second lesson focuses on the way students understand and relate to God and His actions. Although evil and suffering may exist in the world, students will learn to distinguish between characterizing God’s actions, what He wants of us as humans, and what actually happens. This distinction allows students to recognize that God can both exist and be all-Powerful and all-Loving even if they experience suffering.

Lesson instructions
2.1 Teacher reference: Tic-tac-toe recap
2.2 Worksheet: The problem of evil
2.3 Worksheet: Islamic theodicies
2.4 Worksheet: Breaking news
Presentation

Lesson 3: Finding meaning in suffering and evil

In the final lesson of the unit, students are presented with a framework through which they can find meaning in suffering. Rather than thinking of their experiences of pain as purely distressing, students are encouraged to recognize suffering as a moral challenge intended to bring forth the best from within them. They will also learn to reframe their thinking through a theocentric worldview in which suffering is not at odds with a benevolent God.

Lesson instructions
3.1 Worksheet: Attachment styles
3.2 Worksheet: Human suffering
3.3 Worksheet: The Duha approach
3.4 Worksheet: Islamic theocentric worldwide
Presentation

References

References

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